Archive for the ‘Plan China Trip’ Category

How to recognise Chinese currency

Friday, June 25th, 2021
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If you are planning your China tour, before you depart for China it is advisable that you have some basic knowledge on how to recognize Chinese currency and identify fake money as well.

Basically there are five languages ​​on all China’s banknotes : Mandarin Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetan, Uyghur, and Zhuang.

Five languages ​​on all China’s banknotes (Photo from Travel in China 旅游中国 FB)

China’s legal tender is Renminbi ( Abbreviation: RMB), literally meaning “People’s Money”, issurred by the People’s Bank of China. Short official name: CNY (China Yuan), but the short name RMB is also often used. Its symbol: ¥; Monetary unit: Yuan (元) and Fractional units: Jiao (角) and Fen (分).

1 Yuan  = 10 Jiao ( also called “Mao”)

1 Jiao = 10 Fen

Remark: Colloquially in Chinese, the Yuan is often called kuai, and the Jiao is often called mao.

Currently China Money in use is China’s fifth edition of Chinese currency ( 1999 – 2005) circulating from 1999.

The paper money in is 100 Yuan, 50 Yuan, 20 Yuan, 10 Yuan, 5 Yuan, 1 Yuan, 5 Jiao and 1 Jiao.

The coin in is 1 Yuan, 5 Jiao, 1 Jiao, 5 Fen, 2 Fen and 1 Fen

Face Value: 100 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Red

Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong: Main Color of the Face Side: Red

Reverse Side: Great Hall of the People
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Red

Reverse Side: Great Hall of the People; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Red

Face Value: 50 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Green

Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong; Main Color of the Face Side: Green

Reverse Side: The Potala Palace
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Green

Reverse Side: The Potala Palace; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Green

Face Value: 20 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Brown

Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong; Main Color of the Face Side: Brown

Reverse Side: Li River Guilin
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Brown

Reverse Side: Li River Guilin; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Brown

Face Value: 10 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Bluish Black

Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong; Main Color of the Face Side: Bluish Black

Reverse Side: Three Gorges of Yangtze River
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Bluish Black

Reverse Side: Three Gorges of Yangtze River; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Bluish Black

Face Value: 5 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Purple

Reverse Side: Mount Taishan
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Purple

Reverse Side: Mount Taishan; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Purple

Face Value: 1 Yuan (Kuai)
Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong
Main Color of the Face Side: Olive Green

Face side: Head Portrait of Figure of Mao Zedong; Main Color of the Face Side: Olive Green

Reverse Side: The West Lake in Hangzhou
Main Color of the Reverse Side: Olive Green

Reverse Side: The West Lake in Hangzhou; Main Color of the Reverse Side: Olive Green

Coins of Chinese Currency
1 Yuan, 5 Jiao, 1 Jiao, 5 Fen, 2 Fen and 1 Fen

coins

How to identify fake money

It is possible to receive counterfeit money while traveling China. So it is advisable to know to how to identify the fake money.
1. Check the watermark The fifth edition of Chinese currency has a watermark on the left front side. You can easily recognize it against the light.
2. Check the security line There is a golden security line in the middle of RMB100, RMB50, RMB20, RMB10 and RMB5.
3. Check the color and quality
The color of RMB notes is hard to imitate, and counterfeit bills are usually too fuzzy, that is, the images and colors are not so sharp.

Further Readings


Top China Tours
Top 10 Places in China
Chinese Phrases for Travellers
Plugs and sockets in China
What to Bring for China Trip
How to recognise Chinese currency
Top 10 China Tourist Scams
How to get a Chinese Visa
China Trip Planner
China City Maps
China Hotel Booking
China Travelogue
China Facts

Any questions, just drop a line!

Plugs and sockets in China

Wednesday, June 16th, 2021
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Dear Travelers

We’d like to have the following travel guide to be always updated for the benefit of new visitors coming to Beijing and China.

If anybody having used the piece finds necessary updates, please leave a message or feedback. Thanks!

Before packing for your Beijing Tour or China Tour, it is necessary to have some basic knowledge of the electricity in China, its plug and socket system as well.

Kindly Reminder:
Now many of the small carry-on devices like cell phones, cameras, electric toothbrushes,  hair dryers and electric razors are made with international standards using 110/220 (combining the two main standards for voltage and frequency in the world ) with two flat prong charger plugs. And you don’t have to use an adapter while traveling in China. In addition, you can use the two-pin sockets easily here in China with your two flat prong plugs.


Before leaving for China,  make sure your electric devices use 110/220 volts and your plugs have two flat prongs.

By the way, most of the chargers for lap tops are made with three-prong plugs which may not fit into the three flat pin sockets here in China and you need to buy a portable plug adapter at your home country or here in China.

In addition, check out the Voltage for your lap tops to see if they fit into 220 V. If not, you need to use a converter also.

If you have some questions with your plugs, sockets, and Voltage while traveling China, please read the full article.

What Voltage is Used in China?

Basically there are two main standards for voltage and frequency in the world. One is the standard of 110-120 volts at a frequency of 60 Hz (mostly used in USA), and the other is the standard of 220–240 volts at 50 Hz (mostly used in Europe).

China uses generally 220V, 50HZ, AC (Hong Kong is 200V; Taiwan is 110V).

Just list some of the countries with different Voltage Frequencies:
Argentina 220 V 50 Hz
Armenia 220 V 50 Hz
Australia 240 V 50 Hz
Austria 230 V 50 Hz
Belgium 230 V 50 Hz
Brazil 110/220 V 60 Hz
Brunei 240 V 50 Hz
Bulgaria 230 V 50 Hz
Canada 120 V 60 Hz
China, People’s Rep. of 220 V 50 Hz
China (Hong Kong) 220 V 50 Hz
Czech Republic 230 V 50 Hz
Denmark 230 V 50 Hz
England (UK) 230 V 50 Hz
Finland 230 V 50 Hz
France 230 V 50 Hz
French Guiana 220 V 50 Hz
Germany 230 V 50 Hz
Great Britain (UK) 230 V 50 Hz
Greece 220 V 50 Hz
Holland (Netherlands) 230 V 50 Hz
Hong Kong (China) 220 V 50 Hz
Hungary 230 V 50 Hz
Iceland 220 V 50 Hz
India 230 V 50 Hz
Indonesia 127/230 V 50 Hz
Ireland (Eire) 230 50 Hz
Israel 220 V 50 Hz
Italy 230 V 50 Hz
Japan 100 V 50/60 Hz
Korea, South 220 V 60 Hz
Luxembourg 220 V 50 Hz
Macau 220 V 50 Hz
Malaysia 240 V 50 Hz
Mexico 127 V 60 Hz
Netherlands Antilles 127/220 V 50 Hz
New Zealand 230 V 50 Hz
Northern Ireland 230 V 50 Hz
Norway 230 V 50 Hz
Philippines 220 V 60 Hz
Poland 230 V 50 Hz
Portugal 230 V 50 Hz
Romania 230 V 50 Hz
Russia 220 V 50 Hz
Saudi Arabia 127/220 V 60 Hz
South Africa 220/230 V 50 Hz
Spain 230 V 50 Hz
Swaziland 230 V 50 Hz
Sweden 230 V 50 Hz
Switzerland 230 V 50 Hz
Taiwan 110 V 60 Hz
Thailand 220 V 50 Hz
Turkey 230 V 50 Hz
United Arab Emirates 220 V 50 Hz
UK (United Kingdom) 230 V 50 Hz
US (United States) 120 V 60 Hz
Venezuela 120 V 60 Hz
Vietnam 127/220 V 50 Hz

Converters (Most laptops have international converters without any problem)
If you are from the countries where the standard of 110-120 volts at a frequency of 60 Hz is available, you need to have converters for your domestic electric devices to be used on your trip to China. You may prepare yourself a converter with a socket of your home country’s standard.

A converter is an implement that converts the input from 220V to 110V or 120V for your device. Most laptops have international converters without any problem.

Power Plugs and Sockets in China

At present, there is no global standard for plugs and sockets. Traditionally the plugs and sockets are classified into several regional standards in the world like American standard, European standard, British standard, South African standard and Chinese standard.

The standard for Chinese plugs and sockets is set out in GB 2099.1–2008 and GB 1002–2008. Chinese power plugs and power sockets are similar to those in Australia.

A Chinese power plug may fit loosely in an Australian socket, but thick pins of an Australian plug may not fit easily in a Chinese power socket. In China, the sockets are installed upside-down compared to Australian ones.

A standard socket on a wall in China has two flat pins on the upper part and earthed three flat pins on the lower part.

 

Chinese Standard Socket on a wall – Two Pins and Three Pins

You may buy a portable power plug adapter at your home country or here in China. Most of your hotels in China offer free use of plug adapters.

A portable plug
A Chinese standard portable socket

A Chinese three flat prong Plug

A Chinese three flat prong Plug

A Chinese two-prong plug

A Chinese two flat prong plug

Plugs and Sockets in use

Plugs and Sockets in use

Sockets and plugs in use

Sockets and plugs in use

As you see, in China, some locally made electric devices have two flat prong plugs and others three flat prong plugs. If your devices cannot fit into the two-prong or three-prong plugs, you need to prepare yourself for a plug adapter or a converter with a socket of your country’s standard.

Kindly Reminder again:
Now many of the small carry-on devices like cell phones, cameras, electric toothbrushes,  hair dryers and electric razors are made with international standards using 110/220 (combining the two main standards for voltage and frequency in the world ) with two flat prong charger plugs. And you don’t have to use an adapter while traveling in China. In addition, you can use the two flat pin sockets easily here in China with your two flat prong plugs.

Before leaving for China, make sure your electric devices use 110/220 volts and your plugs have two prongs.

By the way, most of the chargers for lap tops are made with three-prong plugs which may not fit into the three-pin sockets here in China and you need to buy a portable plug adapter at your home country or here in China. In addition, check out the Voltage for your lap tops to see if they fit into 220 V. If not, you need to use a converter also.

Further Readings


Top China Tours
Top 10 Places in China
10 Fascinating facts about China
Chinese Phrases for Travellers
Plugs and sockets in China
What to Bring for China Trip
How to recognise Chinese currency
Top 10 China Tourist Scams
How to get a Chinese Visa

Any questions, just drop a line.

How to use ATM in China

Saturday, June 9th, 2018

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Plan your China tour? Generally speaking, China is a very ATM friendly country, especially in the large cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hongkong, Macao and the list can be much longer.

Most of the local ATMs machines accept Visa and Master. CITIBANK card and HSBC are also very popular in China because Citibank and HSBC have an agreement with UnionPay.

For other cards, you may check the ATMs you are going to use and see if they have the logos and signs for your credit cards.

Then how to use ATMs in China?

 

ATMs in China

 1. It is a good idea to get most of cash you are going to use in China through ATMs by using your credit card or debit cards, and dont’ be bothered with great amount of cash before your departure carrying from your home country.

2. Don’t forget to inform your credit card company that you’ll be visiting China or oversea so they don’t block your purchases.

3 Scan your cards (front and back), keep emergency numbers separately in case you lose your credit cards.

4. You should take some home-currency cash with you to exchange at the airport or your hotel upon arrival for taxis or other small expenses, mainly in case that ATMs don’t work or run out of money. Takes one ATM card and possibly a back-up.

5. The major ATMs of the local banks in China include Bank of China, Merchants Bank, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, China Construction Bank and China Agriculture Bank.

VISA and MasterCard debit cards work in most Bank of China ATMs. For the ATMs of the other major banks, please look for a network symbol on the machine that matches a network symbol on the back of your card. CITIBANK card and HSBC card can work in most ATM in China because Citibank and HSBC have an agreement with UnionPay.

6. Most Atms distribute the foreign languages including Chinese(simplified), Chinese(traditional), English, French, Spanish, Portuguese…

7. Most Chinese banks distribute 100 yuan note(You can withdraw 100 yuan minimum.). Check out “How to recognize Chinese currency?“.

8. Most ATM cards issued by major networks can be used in China, transaction fees may be different though, most charge around RMB20 or RMB30 for a one time transaction of RMB2500.

If you are using an ATM Debit card, usually the charges are comparable to drawing money in your own country. If you are using a Credit Card, it can be extremely expensive depending on your bank and how long you take to pay back the money.

9. Keep your ATM receipts so you can re-exchange your Chinese currency back for your home currency on your way out.

10. Basically taking cash out of the ATMs in China is very safe.

06611Tip:  Hassle-free China Guided Tours
If you don’t want to go the do-it-yourself route and prefer the hassle-free escorted tours,  here are some options for guided tours to China.

China join-in small group tours.
China Private Tours.
China Train Tours.
China City Tours.
China Provincial Tours.

Further Readings


Top 10 China experiences China’s Top 10 Most Beautiful Mountains
The Top 10 Most Beautiful Lakes in China The most beautiful waterfalls in China
Top 10 Most Beautiful Grasslands in China Top 10 Most Beautiful Villages in China
Top 10 Old Towns in China The Most Beautiful Rivers in China
Top 10 Places to See Autumn Leaves in China

Any questions, just drop a line