Archive for the ‘Zhejiang Travel’ Category

Chinese bulbuls eating flower petals

Tuesday, February 25th, 2020
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In the evening, a Chinese bulbul was found eating flower petals in the bushes in the distance.

bulbuls eating flower petals

I leaned against a big tree and snapped the moment with my 100-400mm long-lense when the light-vented bulbul was eating the flower petals. It’s a little far away, and the sharpness of my pictures is greatly reduced after cutting. 

bulbuls eating flower petals

The Chinese bulbul, also known as the light-vented bulbul, is a small bird of Bulbul family of Passeriformes, which is songbird.

bulbuls eating flower petals

Pay attention not to fall into the mistake of the Chinese Bulbul’s name. The white of Bulbul is reflected in the back of eyes rather than in the black head; the belly white has yellow green longitudinal lines.

bulbuls eating flower petals

The Chinese bulbul, is mainly found in South Central China, North Vietnam and Taiwan Province.The Chinese bulbul is a common bird in the vast area south of the Yangtze River in China.

bulbuls eating flower petals

It is mainly found in the tree thickets of hills or Plains, and also in coniferous trees. The light-vented bulbul I photographed today is also eating the petals of the coniferous trees.

bulbuls eating flower petals

The color of male and female feathers of the bulbul is similar, so it is difficult to distinguish them. The experienced people can distinguish them according to the characteristics of male’s chest deep gray, while a female’s lighter;  The white of a male bulbul is much clearer reflected in the back of eyes.

bulbuls eating flower petals

The Chinese bulbul is a songbird. The bird is good at singing and its voice is gentle and changeable, pleasant to hear.

bulbuls eating flower petals

The light-vented bulbul often move in small groups of 3-5 to more than 10, sometimes in large groups of more than 20-30 in winter.

bulbuls chirping

The light-vented bulbuls are lively and not very afraid of people. They often jump between branches or fly between adjacent trees.

bulbuls eating flower petals

Generally, they do not fly long distances. They are mainly resident birds and generally do not migrate.

Birding in Beijing

More Birds in my lens

Collared finchbills in Hangzhou

Tuesday, February 25th, 2020
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It is still early spring here in Mid-February in my  hometown – Hangzhou, China.  I live in a community compound known as Shanglinhu, largely situated on a hillslope in the memerizing Fuyang District, west of Hangzhou.  

Collared finchbills

This afternoon,  I spot several collared finchbills singing and dancing in a tree about 2 meters high. Collared finchbills are a kind of songbirds found mainly China, and Vietnam as well. 

Collared finchbills

A collared finchbill, true to its name, has a black head with a  white-colored ring around it neck, likes to forage in the lowland, a low mountain and gardens, perched on treetops, rooftops and telephone wires.

Collared finchbills

I carefully examine  them. All the four birds on the tree  appears fatty annd cute with bright eyes. They are chirpping happily jumping on the tree.

Collared finchbills

Recently, there are a lot of cherry plums in our community in bud, also known as red leaf plum, which attract groups of collared finchbills (2-6 in a group) to taste, chirp and jump happily among the branches. 

Collared finchbills

Cherry plums often has single flowers, pink; the leaves are purple and shiny, and leaves fall in winter. 

Collared finchbills

The collared Finchbill is a local resident birds, which is easy to identify. It is wearing a white scarf (collar), green, light yellow mouth and black head. 

Collared finchbills

Because they are local resident birds, they are not afraid of humen. Sometimes we look at them, they are not nervous. They are calm and live in harmony with us.

Collared finchbills

Birding in Beijing

More Birds in my lens

Move around wearing masks in Hangzhou, China

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020
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The COVID-19 or the novel coronavirus silences China in many ways – from working, studying, trading, entertaining and more in all aspects of life. I happened to be in my hometown – Hangzhou for the Chinese lunar new year 2020 when the virus broke out. In a slight effort to contain the pathogen, I and my wife has been in self-isolation ever since we were required to stay at home and go out only for daily necessities or other necessary matters.

Now things are getting better with the huge commitment jointly made by our Chinese people, especially medical staff who risk their life and by international communities. It seems everything will be back to normal level at the end of March, 2020 – students back to school; workers to factories and business restarts to operate…

Yesterday I drove to the center of Hangzhou city and walk along West Lake – the world cultural heritage site for a photo tour to capture the mask world we are now living with, an interesting reminder for the hard time we are now facing.

A girl wearing a face mask taking photos of tulip tulips by the lake
A selfie girl with a face mask siting on a bench in the lakeside garden
A grandpa wearing a mask reading newspaper in a pavilion by the lake
Three men with masks sitting on a bench by the lake
An old couple with masks sitting on a bench waiting for a public bus
Hand in hand wearing masks walking along West Lake Hangzhou
Wearing mask and taking in the fresh air of early spring, walking on Bai Causeway
Young people wearing masks on the streets
Strolling the lake shoreline wearing masks
A couple wearing masks waking past Broken Bridge
Biking with a mask
A couple in love wearing masks

We are confident that we are able to get rid of masks in the near future with the great efforts made nationally and globally. Life is so beautiful and everything will return to normal.